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Overview

The purpose of this workshop is to explore how digital tools are changing the nature of storytelling across content areas. Digital Stories are short, personal, multimedia tales, told from the heart. You will have the opportunity to investigate, experiment with, and create a digital story that is illustrated with still images and audio. Furthermore, you will understand how this process can be used in the classroom with your students across content areas.




Objectives


You will:
  1. Get acquainted with necessary resources/tool to create a digital story.
  2. Develop an appreciation for digital storytelling.
  3. Successfully write a narrative script for a digital story.
  4. Utilize an approved storyboard template to layout story.
  5. Create and maintain a project folder to manage all materials.
  6. Rehearse and save a preliminary version of the voice over in the appropriate project folder.
  7. Gather and prepare all resources necessary for a digital story.
  8. Successfully combine all materials to create a digital story.






ISTE Standards


This workshop will help teachers accomplish the following standards:
I. Technology Operations and Concepts.
Teachers demonstrate a sound understanding of technology operations and concepts. Teachers:
  1. demonstrate introductory knowledge, skills, and understanding of concepts related to technology.
  2. demonstrate continual growth in technology knowledge and skills to stay abreast of current and emerging technologies.

II. Planning and Designing Learning Environments and Experiences.
Teachers plan and design effective learning environments and experiences supported by technology. Teachers:
  1. design developmentally appropriate learning opportunities that apply technology-enhanced instructional strategies to support the diverse needs of learners.
  2. identify and locate technology resources and evaluate them for accuracy and suitability.
  3. plan for the management of technology resources within the context of learning activities.

III. Teaching, Learning, and the Curriculum
Teachers implement curriculum plans, that include methods and strategies for applying technology to maximize student learning. Teachers:
  1. facilitate technology-enhanced experiences that address content standards and student technology standards.
  2. use technology to support learner-centered strategies that address the diverse needs of students.
  3. apply technology to develop students' higher order skills and creativity.

IV. Assessment and Evaluation
Teachers apply technology to facilitate a variety of effective assessment and evaluation strategies. Teachers:
1. apply multiple methods of evaluation to determine students' appropriate use of technology resources for learning,communication,and productivity.

V. Productivity and Professional Practice
Teachers use technology to enhance their productivity and professional practice. Teachers:
  1. use technology resources to engage in ongoing professional development and lifelong learning.
  2. continually evaluate and reflect on professional practice to make informed decisions regarding the use of technology in support of student learning.

VI. Social, Ethical, Legal, and Human Issues
Teachers understand the social,ethical,legal,and human issues surrounding the use of technology in PK-12 schools.
1. apply technology resources to enable and empower learners with diverse backgrounds, characteristics, and abilities.






Terminology


Storyboard - The story board of a digital story is a major part of the planning process before you should ever begin importing pictures into your digital story. The story board will help you to create an actual storyline for your digital story to keep it interesting for yourself and the audience.

Voice-Over - A voice over is a recording of your voice to place on each photo. Placing your voice recordings in the correct places in your digital story really help to make the stories personal, relevant, and connected.






Articles & Videos

Understanding the concept behind digital storytelling is paramount if you and your students are to produce effective pieces. The following articles should help you appreciate the fusion of audio/visual technology and storytelling as well as the implications that digital storytelling has on the future of education.

Articles

"Capturing Stories, Capturing Lives: An Introduction to Digital Storytelling" by David Jakes at http://www.jakesonline.org/dstory_ice.pdf

"Seven Things You Should Know About Digital Storytelling" from Educause at http://www.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7021.pdf

"Digital Storytelling in the Classrom" from Adobe is a good introducation at http://www.adobe.com/education/digkids/storytelling/classroom.html

This is from the International Society for Technology in Education. - DS-LA_in_Classroom.pdf

This is an article by Cheryl Boes of the Special Interest Group for Elementary Educators (SIGEE) and an Elementary Research Center Teacher at Utica Community Schools. - DS-Cheryl_Boes.pdf

An excellent booklet that is used by the Center for Digital Storytelling for their national workshops is called the "Digital Storytelling Cookbook" and most of it can be downloaded for free from this link http://www.storycenter.org/cookbook.html


Videos














Classroom Examples


Digital Storytelling can be a powerful tool to use in the classroom. The digital stories can be effective if used as a teacher created instructional tool, or as student generated projects and assignments. Each posses great value for the educational process. Below are some examples of digital stories created especially for classroom uses.

What makes a great digital story?
1. What composes a digital story?
2. What is the process of digital storytelling? Explore each component of the process here.
3. What are the seven elements of storytelling design?


Classroom Examples
View examples of the digital stories below. When viewing, jot down notes about what contributes to the QUALITY of the story.

external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngGo to the Center for Digital Storytelling at http://www.storycenter.org/stories/ to see many great examples. Be sure to click on the various links on the left hand side labeled "Community, Education, Family, Health, Identity and Place.

external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngOther Examples


external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngThe University of Houston has some wonderful Personal Reflection stories to view at: http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu/personal_reflection.html (Be sure to scroll to the bottom of the page)

external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngAlso from the University of Houston site are many other digital story examples. Here are Stories that Inform or Instruct
(these seem to work better in Internet Explorer for some reason)


external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngFind out how Tom Banaszewski has used digital story telling with his students.

external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngTales From the Yard - a first grade horror film - http://www.videointheclassroom.com/view_movies/film_pages/tales_from_the_yard.html


external image 0011_arrow%20dithered.pngDigital Storytelling in the Scott County Schools - great website with digital stories from teachers and students. Click on the links in left sidebar menu.





Storyboarding and Scriptwriting


Planning or "storyboarding" your digital story is essential.

1. Steps for Storyboarding
A. MIND SET - Think of your storyboard as a video.
B. SETTING - In your first frame show an overview of your primary setting. Let the setting help communicate the point you want to get across or the mood you want to set.
C. IDENTIFY THE CHARACTERS - A few examples are: protagonist (main character or hero/heroine name,
characteristics and role) or antagonist (against the protagonist, characteristics and role)
D. PLOT
E. MESSAGE - What is it that you are trying to point out? What is important to you/your "story"? What is the lesson, moral, perspective on life or observation about life?

2. The Story About an Event in My Life Accomplishment stories - Accomplishment stories are about achieving a goal, like graduating from school or being on a winning team in a sporting event.

Questions to think about:
  • How did you first feel about this event?
  • What are your feelings now about being here?
  • What have you learned from this event?
  • How has this event changed your life?
  • What do you see in your future as far as "writing" is concerned?

3. Storyboard and write a short script of your digital story on the storyboard handout. Click here if you need to see a blankstoryboardsample.pdf.




Tell a story - Step-by-Step Instructions



In this activity, you will download the Photo Story 3 program and utilize step-by-step instructions and video tutorials to prepare yourself to create your own digital story.

Download Photo Story 3: Click here to download your free copy of PhotoStory 3.


Step-by-Step Instructions and Video Tutorials

Use the following tools to enhance your in-class experience. It may help to run through all the video tutorials and try some of the steps before tackling the big project.

Watch these video tutorials:

external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 01 | Beginning the digital storytelling process, corresponds to pages 1-2 of the tutorial handout.
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 02 | Removing black borders from images, corresponds to page 3 of the tutorial handout.
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 03 | Adding text to a title slide or image, corresponds to page 4 of the tutorial handout.
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 04 | Adding your voice narration.
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 05 | Customizing motion with Pans
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 06 | Customizing motion with Zooms
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 07 | Fine tuning motion in your digital story
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 08 | Adding transitions
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 09 | Adding background music-mp3's
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 10 | Adding background music-onboard music
external image video-32x32.pngTutorial 11 | Finishing Your Digital Story



If you prefer to work from hard copy, print the following tutorial:

Photostory 3 Tutorial from Jakesonline.org

The items below are additional handouts that you can use

  1. external image type_pdf.gifTutorial Storyboard
  2. external image type_pdf.gifStoryBoarding Template
  3. external image type_pdf.gifPhotostory
  4. external image type_pdf.gifSaving Photostory Project
  5. external image type_pdf.gifCopyright
  6. external image type_pdf.gifTake Six Script Help
  7. external image type_pdf.gifTutorial on Customizing Motion
  8. external image type_pdf.gifPreviewing Photostory
  9. external image type_pdf.gifAdding Narration
  10. external image type_pdf.gifSAISD Digital Storytelling Handout





Create a Digital Story


In this activity, you will create your own digital story. Use the step by step instructions and the rubric on the assessment page to guide you in developing your story. Good luck and have fun!

Project

  • Now that you have reviewed the steps for creating a digital story in Activity 3, it is your turn to use PhotoStory 3 to create your own digital story. If you have any problems refer back to the Step by Step Instructions above.

  • A Checklist is shown below to help you with your project.




Assessment


Complete this checklist as you accomplish each activity.

Checklist:
  • I have studied the resources and tools necessary to create a digital story.
  • I understand the concept of digital storytelling.
  • I have created and submitted a narrative script for my story.
  • I used a storyboard to plan my project.
  • I created and utilized project folder to maintain all materials.
  • I have a copy of my preliminary voice over in my project folder.
  • I found all the resources necessary for my digital story.
  • I have completed and shared my digital story.


Digital Storytelling Rubric



This rubric should be used to assess teacher project and may be altered to an age appropriate level for individual student work.


CATEGORY
4 Points
3 Points
2 Points
1 Points
1. Purpose of Story
Establishes a purpose early on and maintains a clear focus throughout.
Establishes a purpose early on and maintains focus for most of the presentation.
There are a few lapses in focus, but the purpose is fairly clear.
It is difficult to figure out the purpose of the presentation.
2. Point of View
The point of view is well developed and contributes to the overall meaning of the story.
The point of view is stated but does not connect with each part of the story, although an attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story.
The point of view is stated but no attempt is made to connect it to the overall meaning of the story.
The point of view is only hinted at, or is difficult to discern.
3. Dramatic Question
A meaningful dramatic question is asked and answered within the context of the story.
A dramatic question is asked but not clearly answered within the context of the story.
A dramatic question is hinted at but not clearly established within the context of the story.
Little or no attempt is made to pose a dramatic question or answer it.
4. Choice of Content
Contents create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors.
Contents create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors.
An attempt was made to use contents to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical.
Little or no attempt to use contents to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone.
5. Clarity of Voice
Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the presentation.
Voice quality is clear and consistently audible throughout the majority (85-95%) of the presentation.
Voice quality is clear and consistently audible through some (70-84%)of the presentation.
Voice quality needs more attention.
6. Pacing of Narrative
The pace (rhythm and voice punctuation) fits the story line and helps the audience really "get into" the story.
Occasionally speaks too fast or too slowly for the story line. The pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation) is relatively engaging for the audience.
Tries to use pacing (rhythm and voice punctuation), but it is often noticeable that the pacing does not fit the story line. Audience is not consistently engaged.
No attempt to match the pace of the storytelling to the story line or the audience.
7. Meaningful Audio Soundtrack
Music stirs a rich emotional response that matches the story line well. Images coordinated with the music.
Music stirs a rich emotional response that somewhat matches the story line. Images mostly coordinated with the music.
Music is ok, and not distracting, but it does not add much to the story. Not coordinated with images.
Music is distracting, inappropriate, OR was not used.
8. Quality of Images
Images create a distinct atmosphere or tone that matches different parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors.
Images create an atmosphere or tone that matches some parts of the story. The images may communicate symbolism and/or metaphors.
An attempt was made to use images to create an atmosphere/tone but it needed more work. Image choice is logical.
Little or no attempt to use images to create an appropriate atmosphere/tone.
9. Economy of Story Detail
The story is told with exactly the right amount of detail throughout. It does not seem too short nor does it seem too long
The story composition is typically good, though it seems to drag somewhat OR need slightly more detail in one or two sections.
The story seems to need more editing. It is noticeably too long or too short in more than one section.
The story needs extensive editing. It is too long or too short to be interesting.
10. Grammar and Language Usage
Grammar and usage were correct (for the dialect chosen) and contributed to clarity, style and character development.
Grammar and usage were typically correct (for the dialect chosen) and errors did not detract from the story.
Grammar and usage were typically correct but errors detracted from story.
Repeated errors in grammar and usage distracted greatly from the story.

Source: Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling





Reflect and Discuss


Use this area to post any ideas you may have for using photostory 3 and to discuss the questions below.
Discuss and Reflect:

  • List some of the ways that photostory 3 can be used in the classroom?
  • Why do you feel that it's important that teachers offer photostory 3 as an alternative to turning in paper and pencil assignments?

Alignment with 21st Century Skills






Useful Links


Story Board Resouces

Storyboard Organizer
Simple Storyboard Form
The Persuasion Map


Free Images
Blank Slides http://www.jakesonline.org/blankslides.htm
Images http://www.pics4learning.com/details.php?img=fabric125.jpg

Free Music
http://freeplaymusic.com/


Other Useful Links

http://www.inms.umn.edu/elements/
  • The Elements of Digital Storytelling

http://dsi.kqed.org/index.php/workshops/about/C66/
  • Digital Storytelling Initiative

http://www.eastaustinstories.org/
  • East Austin Stories- The University of UT at Austin

http://digitalstorytelling.coe.uh.edu/personal_reflection.html
  • Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling

http://tech-head.com/dstory.htm
  • Tech Head Stories

http://its.ksbe.edu/dst/
  • Integrating Digital Storytelling into the Classroom

http://www.teachnet.ie/innovative_teacher/default.asp?NCID=365
  • Innovative Teacher- Creating your Digital Story

http://lifehacker.com/software/geek-to-live/geek-to-live-how-to-create-a-multimedia-photo-movie-141957.php
  • How to Create a Multimedia Photo Movie

http://news.yahoo.com/photos/gallery/705
  • Top Stories and Photos on Yahoo

http://www.techlearning.com/shared/printableArticle.php?articleID=196604105
  • How to Create Slideshows using PhotoStory 3

http://www.microsoft.com/windowsxp/using/digitalphotography/photostory/default.mspx
  • Link to download PhotoStory 3